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SQL Query: 3 Methods for Calculating Cumulative SUM

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SQL provides various constructs for calculating cumulative sums, offering flexibility and efficiency in data analysis. In this article, we explore three distinct SQL queries that facilitate the computation of cumulative sums. Each query leverages different SQL constructs to achieve the desired outcome, catering to diverse analytical needs and preferences. Using Window Functions (e.g., PostgreSQL, SQL Server, Oracle) SELECT id, value, SUM(value) OVER (ORDER BY id) AS cumulative_sum  FROM your_table; This query uses the SUM() window function with the OVER clause to calculate the cumulative sum of the value column ordered by the id column. Using Subqueries (e.g., MySQL, SQLite): SELECT t1.id, t1.value, SUM(t2.value) AS cumulative_sum FROM your_table t1 JOIN your_table t2 ON t1.id >= t2.id GROUP BY t1.id, t1.value ORDER BY t1.id; This query uses a self-join to calculate the cumulative sum. It joins the table with itself, matching rows where the id in the first table is greater than or

10 Top Blockchain Advantages for Finance Projects

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In the business world, the transactions are — orders, payments, account tracking and much more. Often, each participant has his or her own ledger — and, thus, a version of the truth that may differ from other participants. Top Blockchain Features   You can avoid fraud... These multiple ledgers can be a recipe for error, fraud, and inefficiency. But because members on a blockchain share a common view of the truth, it’s now possible to see all details of a transaction end-to-end, reducing those vulnerabilities . Ordinary ledger Vs Shared Ledger Each participant has his own, separate ledger — increasing the possibility of human error or fraud. Reliance on intermediaries for validation creates inefficiencies. Can become a paper-laden process, resulting in frequent delays and potential losses for all stakeholders. How to Avoid the Complexity Single, shared, tamper-evident ledger — once recorded, transactions cannot be altered. All parties must give consensus before a new transactio