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SQL Query: 3 Methods for Calculating Cumulative SUM

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SQL provides various constructs for calculating cumulative sums, offering flexibility and efficiency in data analysis. In this article, we explore three distinct SQL queries that facilitate the computation of cumulative sums. Each query leverages different SQL constructs to achieve the desired outcome, catering to diverse analytical needs and preferences. Using Window Functions (e.g., PostgreSQL, SQL Server, Oracle) SELECT id, value, SUM(value) OVER (ORDER BY id) AS cumulative_sum  FROM your_table; This query uses the SUM() window function with the OVER clause to calculate the cumulative sum of the value column ordered by the id column. Using Subqueries (e.g., MySQL, SQLite): SELECT t1.id, t1.value, SUM(t2.value) AS cumulative_sum FROM your_table t1 JOIN your_table t2 ON t1.id >= t2.id GROUP BY t1.id, t1.value ORDER BY t1.id; This query uses a self-join to calculate the cumulative sum. It joins the table with itself, matching rows where the id in the first table is greater than or

Scala: Unique features you need to know

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Let us start it in layman terms... Why you need Scala... The name Scala stands for “scalable language.” The language is so named because it was designed to grow with the demands of its users. Where Scala can be applied... You can apply Scala to a wide range of programming tasks, from writing small scripts to building large systems.   The real use of Scala... Scala is easy to get into. It runs on the standard Java platform and interoperates seamlessly with all Java libraries. It’s quite a good language for writing scripts that pull together Java components. But it can apply its strengths even more when used for building large systems and frameworks of reusable components. Technically, Scala is a blend of object-oriented and functional programming concepts in a statically typed language. The fusion of object-oriented  and functional programming shows up in many different aspects of Scala; It is probably more pervasive than in any other widely used language.