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How to Compare Text in Python

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Python like other programming languages supports comparison operators. These primarily use to test the condition in the program. Here's a list of operators that you can use in python programs. Comparison operators List of operators < <= > >= == != Is is not How to use comparison operators Here, I have assigned 23 to a and 11 to b. Then, I did apply all the comparison operators. The output is self-explanatory, and If you are in doubt while programming, remember to visit this page. Examples a = 23 b = 11 print("Is a greater than b?", a > b)           #greater than print("Is a less than b?", a < b)              #less than print("Is a greater or equal to b?", a >= b)   #greater or equal print("Is a less or equal to b?", a <= b)      #less or equal print("Is a equal to b (option 1)?", a == b)         #test for equality print("Is a equal to b (option 2)?", a is b)         #test for equality print("I

R Language: How to Use 'Help' Command

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Help command in R-Language R has an inbuilt help facility similar to the man facility of UNIX. To get more information on any specific named function, for example solve, the command is > help(solve) An alternative is > ?solve For a feature specified by special characters, the argument must be enclosed in double or single quotes, making it a “character string”: This is also necessary for a few words with syntactic meaning including if, for and function. > help("[[") Either form of quote mark may be used to escape the other, as in the string "It’s important". Our convention is to use double quote marks for preference. On most R installations help is available in HTML format by running > help.start() which will launch a Web browser that allows the help pages to be browsed with hyperlinks. On UNIX, subsequent help requests are sent to the HTML-based help system. The ‘Search Engine and Keywords’ link in the page loaded by help.start() is par